Many individuals touched by the ideals and philosophy of IofC have gone on to influence change in their communities, countries and beyond. In Australia, leaders have emerged from Indigenous, migrant and diaspora communities, who found that forgiveness and personal release from bitterness has promoted a cycle of positive action rippling out to touch many others. These are a sample of stories of change from individuals associated with IofC Australia, who took on board the message that, ‘Change begins with me.’

Personal Stories
Thursday, 22 November, 2018
Kim and Betty Beazley

The Member for Fremantle was the youngest ever. Kim Beazley Sr took the seat of wartime Prime Minister John Curtin at the age of 28. On a trip to the MRA world conference centre in Caux, Switzerland, a British Labour Party friend suggested he seek God’s guidance, having ‘nothing to prove, nothing to justify and nothing to gain for yourself.’ Beazley devoted himself to honesty in politics, retiring after a 32-year career in parliament. Among many achievements, he is credited with ‘the honeymoon period’ for education financing and reforms that allowed for Indigenous children in schools to learn in their mother tongues as well as in English.

Monday, 26 November, 2018

Jim Beggs first went to work on the Melbourne waterfront for the money. Wharfies, he heard, received, ‘the wages of the Prime Minister and half the cargo.’ In the early 1950s, the waterfront ran on a system of casual labor and, he recalls, ‘The only time you read about the wharfies was when they were on strike, or pilfering something.’ After beginning to apply the personal standards of IofC in his own life, he went on to national leadership of the waterside workers in industrial negotiations that transformed working conditions and created new productivity agreements.

Monday, 26 November, 2018

From a firmly atheist background, Jim Coulter's early encounters with IofC (then Moral Re-armament) while at school in Perth, WA, encouraged him to begin seeking divine guidance in daily matters: early changes in his life included lightening his stepmother’s household duties, to treating his then-girlfriend (now wife of 60-plus years) with greater respect. After serving as a pilot in World War II, he concluded that, ‘Once you get into a war, there are no right or wrong decisions, only ones that may be less wrong than others.’ He gave his life to work for peace, based on the changes he had experienced and witnessed in those around him.

Wednesday, 21 November, 2018

Nyok Gor was just eight when his father was killed by the Khartoum regime in Sudan. Over a four-year period, he walked hundreds of kilometers before reaching Kakuma refugee camp in northwestern Kenya. After settling in Australia, he began campaigning for South Sudan’s peace and independence, during a time of violence that also affected its overseas diaspora. When his own cousin was killed in tribal clashes, he reached out to the opposing group in Melbourne’s South Sudan community, offering friendship. Braving many hardships, he continues to visit the fledgling nation, taking part in reconciliation efforts that continue today.

Wednesday, 21 November, 2018
Marge Tucker

Removed from her family as a child and sent out to work as a domestic servant at 16, Lilardia (her tribal name) found inspiration to change when she went to the US with Moral Rearmament (MRA). Margaret Tucker – Aunty Marge to those who knew her – became one of the early women leaders in the Aboriginal Advancement League in Victoria. In her autobiography, If everyone cared, the first published story by one of the ‘Stolen Generations’, she wrote, ‘I’d like to do the wild corroboree when I feel angry…but what is the use of remembering with bitterness? We need to think positively how to put right what is wrong in Australia today.

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