Read the latest reviews of books and films about building a better world.

Reviews
Tuesday, 11 June, 2019
Image courtesy of http://hoperoad.com.au

Zacharia dreams of building a school in the South Sudan village he left as a refugee long ago. His English language teacher in Australia thinks it’s a great idea, and so do some of her friends, who rally round to raise funds. He flies back to South Sudan and is reunited with relatives, friends and neighbours, all of whom are keen for the project to happen. What could possibly go wrong?

Friday, 31 August, 2018

At an average of two metres above sea level, the Central Pacific nation of Kiribati has become one of climate change’s most visible victims. We follow Maria Tiimon as she pleads her country’s case to a painfully ambivalent international community. The Hungry Tide asks: if Kiribati is the climate change canary in the coal-mine, why are we still digging?

Thursday, 26 July, 2018

Legendary Australian actor and ex-Ramingining resident David Gulpilil narrates a stark, yet multi-layered and richly-photographed documentary that brings new perspective to understanding what self-determination actually means.

Friday, 15 June, 2018

Through Constance, we get a glimpse of the refugee settlement struggle, as she and her family deal with problems around integration, legal troubles, and complex mental health issues in their new home of Wagga Wagga, NSW.

Wednesday, 28 February, 2018

The film sheds light on Frank Buchman's philosophy and experiences in creating peace in a cynical and war-torn world

Wednesday, 28 February, 2018

'The Man Who Built Peace' sheds light on Frank Buchman's philosophy and experiences in creating peace in a cynical and war-torn world. In essence, the film paints Buchman as an unsung hero who was deeply involved in spiritual and practical means of reconciling relations and healing wounds. His efforts in conflict resolution involving countries affected by World War II, including France, Germany, Japan and the Philippines, are central to the film’s narrative. Footage of actual events that took place in this process powerfully depict the importance of seeking and accepting forgiveness. The film shows his wisdom, passion for spiritual enlightenment and love for people. 'You can plan a new world on paper but you have to build it out of people,' Buchman argues.

Wednesday, 28 February, 2018

The film sheds light on Frank Buchman's philosophy and experiences in creating peace in a cynical and war-torn world

Friday, 17 November, 2017

The Cambodian genocide is a subject we in the West are taught little, if anything, about. Any link between The Beatles and Pol Pot is tenuous at first glance but, as the 2014 documentary Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten shows, rock ’n’ roll was an effective weather vane for the political climate in ‘60s and ‘70s Cambodia. Initiatives of Change showcased Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten on Thursday 30 November at Armagh in Melbourne. The documentary is a philosophical corollary to its recent screening of Across the Universe (2007) – a musical built on Beatles songs, which follows two star-crossed lovers as they navigate the turbulence of the free-love era. In contrast, Don’t Think I’ve Forgotten offers a deeply affecting portrait of Cambodia’s descent into a dark revolution that would kill an estimated 25 per cent of the population.

Wednesday, 08 November, 2017
That Other Voice book cover

British journalist and broadcaster Graham Turner's new book, That Other Voice, addresses the fundamental issue of whether or not there is a God who can speak to us in this day and age. And, if so, how? Turner takes a suitably sceptical view without making any presumptions. He interviews people from the major faith traditions: Jewish, Hindu, Christian, sufi Muslim, Tibet Buddhist and including the emphasis of Initiatives of Change on silent listening in 'quiet times'.

Thursday, 19 October, 2017

In any field of endeavour – the arts, science, sports, medicine, media, politics, whatever - being a consistent practitioner over 50 years or more gives a significant span of experience, learning and human connections to draw from. Brian Lightowler has had more than half a century of daily practice in the principles and application of Initiatives of Change, or ‘Moral Re-Armament’ as it was called when he first encountered it. That is, in the practice of the dynamics of inner change drawing on a spiritual search and a moral code of integrity to guide one’s relationships and actions—and then, by extension, seeking to apply those same principles to shift and transform what is going so wrong in the world around us.

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Friday, 31 August, 2018

At an average of two metres above sea level, the Central Pacific nation of Kiribati has become one of climate change’s most visible victims. We follow Maria Tiimon as she pleads her country’s case to a painfully ambivalent international community. The Hungry Tide asks: if Kiribati is the climate change canary in the coal-mine, why are we still digging?

Thursday, 26 July, 2018

Legendary Australian actor and ex-Ramingining resident David Gulpilil narrates a stark, yet multi-layered and richly-photographed documentary that brings new perspective to understanding what self-determination actually means.

Friday, 15 June, 2018

Through Constance, we get a glimpse of the refugee settlement struggle, as she and her family deal with problems around integration, legal troubles, and complex mental health issues in their new home of Wagga Wagga, NSW.

Pages